Ash Randall, football freestyle and 10,000 hours of practice

A popular theory suggests that practising any skill for 10,000 hours is enough to make you an expert. While researchers argue over the exact number of hours, it is true that purposeful practice helps you improve your skills at anything you have a go at.

Today, we met Ash Randall, a football freestyler who has spent many hours practising and developing his skills. He told us how he practised for an average of five hours a day for ten years in order to become one of the world’s most accomplished football freestyler.

In morning assembly, he put on a fabulous freestyle demonstration of tricks and flicks. Then, over the course of the day, each class took part in an all action football freestyle workshop in the hall. In this session, Ash introduced them to a range of tricks and gave them tips on how to practice and improve.

Take a look at the photographs of the whole school getting to grips with freetsyle football tricks.

If you want to learn more, click here to see a playlist of skills tutorials that builds on what Ash showed the children in the workshop.

What skill or activity do you want to master? Leave a comment with your stories of how you have had to practice and persevere to improve your ability in your chosen skill.

The Testing Camera – Growth Mindset and SATS – a message to people who do not like tests

Watch this video.

A SAT does not reflect who you are, what you are worth or even how much you have learned. It provides a snapshot of what you are capable of understanding on a particular given day. It gives you a standardised score and is one way of indicating where you are in your learning compared to age related expectations.

But this is not all it provides. It also presents you with  opportunities: opportunities to challenge yourself, work intensely and independently for an extended period of time, puzzle things out for yourself, struggle, make mistakes, succeed, reflect on things you know how to do, identify things that you do not know how to do YET, celebrate your successes and mull over your failures to name but a few.

Taking tests is part of school life. Y6 provides the first real testing opportunity for many of you with the SAT tests in May. These tests are the first in a raft of many tests that you will take as you go through your school lives. So, how should you approach them?

Here’s a list of comments made by Y6 children about sitting tests:

  • Do not be scared or afraid of the test.
  • Read each question carefully
  • Think carefully and puzzle things out
  • Use trial and improvement if it is appropriate
  • Work quickly and carefully
  • Ask to have a question read to you if you don’t understand it
  • Pace yourself through the test – take notice of how much time you have
  • If you are stuck on a question or it takes a long time, move on and come back to it
  • Have confidence in yourself as a learner and do the best you can

A test, while focussing your attention upon a particular area such as maths, is about much more than just that. Whether you are happy with your final score or not, remember to think about the learning that came out of simply taking the test itself. One day, you’ll take a driving test, go for a job interview, do a GCSE, A- level or degree exam, take a ballet or music exam, complete a swimming assessment, go for a sports trial, be observed by OFSTED…the list is endless.

Your SATS are a great place to begin developing a healthy growth mindset towards tests and being tested. Try and use it as a learning opportunity.

Spellings with a ‘Growth Mindset’

garyplayer

Having a ‘Growth Mindset’ means that you believe you can make progress and improve your skills and capabilities at anything you turn your mind to.

Over the past 4 weeks, the children in Y6 have been preparing for the Y6 Spelling Bee finals. To do this they have been learning spellings from Y5/6 word list. HOWEVER, the tests have had a subtle difference.

In week 1, the children did a blind test, spelling 20 words chosen at random from the word list. Having recorded their scores, they went away and worked on the same 20 spellings in preparation for the follow up test a week later. After the follow up test, the children could look at their progress score.  This score provides a clear indicator to each child – the more work you put into your spellings, the better your score.

This serves as in important motivating factor and a focus for improvement. It also gives children the opportunity to set their own targets and reflect upon their own performance. These are important skills for all independent learners. In our improvement score discussions, it is no coincidence that children who claim to have put a lot of effort into working on their spellings had the greater progress scores. Similarly, those who had lower progress scores said that they did less practice.

Year 5 & 6 Word List

accommodateaccompany

according

achieve

aggressive

amateur

ancient

apparent

appreciate

attached

available

average

awkward

bargain

bruise

category

cemetery

committee

communicate

community

competition

conscience

conscious

controversy

convenience

 

correspondcriticise (critic + ise)

curiosity

definite

desperate

determined

develop

dictionary

disastrous

embarrass

environment

equip

(–ped, –ment)

especially

exaggerate

excellent

existence

explanation

familiar

foreign

forty

frequently

government

guarantee

harass

hindrance

 

identityimmediate(ly)

individual

interfere

interrupt

language

leisure

lightning

marvellous

mischievous

muscle

necessary

neighbour

nuisance

occupy

occur

opportunity

parliament

persuade

physical

prejudice

privilege

profession

programme

pronunciation

 

queuerecognise

recommend

relevant

restaurant

rhyme

rhythm

sacrifice

secretary

shoulder

signature

sincere(ly)

soldier

stomach

sufficient

suggest

symbol

system

temperature

thorough

twelfth

variety

vegetable

vehicle

yacht

 

 

The staff team put their brains together and learn about a ‘Growth Mindset’

Take a look at our brain hats.

In our twilight staff meeting this week, we spent time exploring what it means to teach and learn with a ‘Growth Mindset’. We used our brain hats to capture the important messages from the session that we want to work on and develop with the children.

During the session, we looked at the attached Powerpoint presentation and explored the growth mindset blog. We took Angela Duckworth’s   Grit Test. We discussed a range of things including how we can use praise and mistakes  to encourage a growth mindset inside the classroom and across school.

If you are curious and would like to know more about what a ‘Growth Mindset’ is click on this link to visit the Theory Pages for Parents and Teachers.

Mindset staff meeting May 2016 final

 

Welcome to the Burley and Woodhead Growth Mindset Blog

 

This blog will host information and celebrate work that we have been doing in school to promote teaching and learning with a growth mindset.

This poster is a great place to start – it outlines key principles that we are hoping to develop in our classrooms to teach our children to become resilient, enthusiastic and successful lifelong learners.

growth-mindset-graphic-from-matt-bromleys-blog

Click on this link to read more details about the contents of the poster.